2013-06-20 / History

THE NORTHFIELD NEWS IN HISTORY

Compiled by PHILO HALL for the Northfield News

125 Years Ago The Northfield News

June 20, 1888 3 cents a copy/ $1.50 a year

Fred N. Whitney, Editor

The 54th annual commencement of Norwich University occurred last week and passes into history as the most successful since the institution was removed to Northfield. Its growth during several years past and more particularly during the last two years is most satisfactory. The enviable reputation it is now gaining in this and other states makes it probable that at no distant day it will exceed in popularity its most balmy days at Norwich, before the demand upon its students to fill honorable positions in the ranks during the rebellion left it in a somewhat impaired condition. This year an old feature of commencement week was revived in the annual encampment on the parade ground, which commenced on the 7th and continued until Friday. Tents and other necessary articles were furnished by the state and this plan of course added much to the instruction in the military department of the institution. Sunday, June 10, at 4 p.m., Rev. A.H. Webb delivered the baccalaureate sermon at the M.E. church…Mr. Webb’s sermon was a most able and practical effort and delivered in a manner to hold the closest attention of the large congregation present…On Monday was held the annual target practice and an excellent record was scored. On Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. occurred the annual field day sports at the parade ground…Tuesday evening the Alpha Sigma Pi and Theta Chi societies held their annual banquets… On Wednesday afternoon was held the trustees meeting. Hon. Frank Plumley was elected a trustee in place of George W. Soper, deceased. The trustees requested the alumni to elect five of their number who shall be trustees in accordance with the endowment plan. The trustees were unanimously in favor of the enforcement of more ridged discipline and that the military feature of the school be made even more prominent.

100 Years Ago The Northfield News

June 24, 1913 3 cents a copy/ $1.50 a year

Erval Whitney, Editor

Now comes the police superintendent of Indianapolis with a regulation that women wearing the new slit skirt must also wear undergarments. Also a Milwaukee judge has fined a woman for wearing a skirt that did not come within 12 inches from the ground. The latter official would find considerable work at any bathing resort. While these efforts to enforce modesty are of course, well meant, there is an authority that is far more efficient than any official created by the works of man. And that authority is Madame Grundy, the spirit of gossip, who soon enough places her fatal veto upon departure from common sense and womanliness. It can be predicted that the near future will see radical changes in women’s dress. For centuries conventionality has compelled them to swathe themselves in various layers of inner and outer clothing. These merely concealed the form and motions of the body, but made healthful exercise difficult. The principal reason why women have missed the stimulation of athletics has been that custom did not permit them to dress for such exercise. Any costume that hampers and restricts the physical development of half the human race is all wrong.

One of the most encouraging signs of co-operation among the farmers of this state that has come to our attention is a case in Irasburg. Something over a year ago the farmers in that town bought a creamery and have run it cooperatively and with such benefits as they are now organizing a co-operative blacksmith association…What great opportunities are before the farmer along the co-operative idea, not only in the lines of things he must have but the things he must sell.

75 Years Ago News & Advertiser

June 23, 1938

5 cents a copy/ $2 a year

John E. Mazuzan, Editor

The asset that the local Rock of Ages granite plant in Northfield was further emphasized last week with the announcement that the corporation’s Barclay unit in Barre will be closed and much of the work done there will be produced in Northfield.

WASHINGTON- The 75th Congress, which was to have helped balance the nation’s Budget, went home last week after a 154-day session in which it appropriated $12,321,635,000…It brought the 75th Congress’ spending total to $21,656,174,000 for all three sessions. It shot the net deficit for fiscal 1938 up to $1,250,000,000, and forecast a deficit of at least $3,722,000,000 for fiscal 1939. It meant that the national debt, which stood at 37,379,410,474 on June 1, had a good chance of passing $40,000,000,000by this time next year, an increase of $20,000,000,000 since Franklin Roosevelt took office. Spending was by all odds the biggest job performed by the 75th Congress.

50 Years Ago News & Advertiser

June 20, 1963

5 cents a copy/ $2 a year

John E. Mazuzan, Editor

Harold Hazelton will leave Thursday for a fishing trip in Canada. He will be accompanied by William Duke and William Smith of Montpelier, his former buddies in boot camp at Sampson, N.Y., 20 years ago.

About 20 volunteers turned out for the work night at the playground last week. They came with lawn mowers and other equipment. When the sun went down, both ball diamonds looked in fine shape, part of the area was mowed and clipped, most of the pool area was painted, some plumbing repairs were made and the water system was made ready for the summer.

25 Years Ago Northfield News

June 23, 1988

25 cents a copy/ $2 a year

Erik Nelson, Editor

Possible building sites were reviewed by the Northfield Board of School Directors and John Rahill, architect, Monday night…Building sites were the Bean property, which extends north from Memorial park; the Cheney farm, located behind the Norwich ski area, and the Goodrich property which is south on Route 12.

In a unanimous vote the Department of Libraries voted to retain the name of Mill Hill Road, according to the vote at Town Meeting. Patricia Klinck, state librarian, said 80 people attended the meeting this morning. “It was democracy at its best,” she said.

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